Modern Design Blog

Tea sets designs

How tea sets design ruled the past century

How can a single object take on infinite shapes and perfectly embody the spirit of its time? Leave it to design to turn something as simple and ordinary as a tea set into a museum quality piece. Here’s a look at how these objects have inspired designers during the last century.

Tea Sets Designs of the 1920s and ‘30s

In the ‘20s and ‘30s, design was largely inspired by the avant-garde art influences of the time, which pushed the boundaries in terms of colors and form.

Tea Set by Casa Giuseppe Mazzotti (1925 ca.)

Tea set designed by Casa Mazzotti

Source: “Arts & Foods: Rituals Since 1851” Exhibit (Triennale di Milano)

Around 1925-1935, Casa Giuseppe Mazzotti contributed to the Futurism movement with designs that celebrated technogical progress, movement and bold shapes. Still going strong today, the company is located in the small Italian town of Albisola, famous for its many ceramics manufacturers.

Tea Sets designed by Nikolai Mikhailovic Suetin

Nikolai Mikhailovic Suetin was a graphic artist, designer, and ceramic painter of the Russian Suprematism movement, characterized by abstract art based on “non-objective” geometric shapes in alignment.

Carousel Set by Nikolai Mikhailovic Suetin

Carousel Set (1931). Source: “Arts & Foods: Rituals Since 1851” Exhibit (Triennale di Milano)

Suprematism Tea Set design by Nikolai Mikhailovic Suetin

Suprematism Set (1923). Source: “Arts & Foods: Rituals Since 1851” Exhibit (Triennale di Milano)

Tea set designed by Nikolai Mikhailovic Suetin

Tea Set (1930). Source: “Arts & Foods: Rituals Since 1851” Exhibit (Triennale di Milano)  

Tea Set by Nicola Diulgheroff (1932)

Bulgarian artist Nicola Diulgheroff was mostly active in Italy as part of the Futurism movement.

Tea set by Nicola Diulgheroff

Source: “Arts & Foods: Rituals Since 1851” Exhibit (Triennale di Milano)  

Teapots by Dante Baldelli of Rometti Ceramics (1930-1935)

Mid-Century Modern pottery designs characterized by vibrant colors and geometric patterns.

Dante Baldelli teapots

Source: “Arts & Foods: Rituals Since 1851” Exhibit (Triennale di Milano)  

“Sphere” Set designed by Guido Andloviz (1933)

Sphere tea set by Guido Andloviz

Source: “Arts & Foods: Rituals Since 1851” Exhibit (Triennale di Milano)  

Tea Sets Designs of the ‘50s and ‘70s

In the ‘50s and ‘70s, design departed – for the most part – from the extravagance of the previous decades and got in search of more quiet aesthetics.

Form 2000 Set designed by Raymond Loewy for Rosenthal China (1954)

Embodying the angular and sleek stylishness of the design movement of the post-war era.

Form 2000 tea set

Source: “Arts & Foods: Rituals Since 1851” Exhibit (Triennale di Milano)  

Tea Set by Riccardo Schweizer for Pagnossin (1970 ca.)

Pagnossin tea set design

Source: “Arts & Foods: Rituals Since 1851” Exhibit (Triennale di Milano)  

Alto Basso Tea Set by Ambrogio Pozzi of Pozzi Ceramics (1972)

Alto Basso Tea set

Source: “Arts & Foods: Rituals Since 1851” Exhibit (Triennale di Milano)  

Contemporary Tea Sets Design

What about now? Tea and coffee serving continues to challenge high-end designers to push the envelope through forms that are all about lightness, movement, simplicity and elegance.

Seoul Tea Service designed by Daniel Widrig for NY Projects

Seoul tea set

Source: The Red List  

Baindoles Tea Service by Armani Casa

Teapot, milk jug, and sugar basin, all black colour silver-plated. Alternating sharp edges and curved shapes enhance the volumes.

Baindoles tea set by Armani Casa 

Source: Armani Casa  

HELENA Teapot by Spanish designer Helena Rohner for Georg Jensen

HELENA teapot design

Source: Georg Jensen  

What’s your favorite of these tea sets designs?